New Titles

Open Reading Period! March 15 - April 15



New Title Special: Purchase All 3 Books for $30
Wild Grass on the Riverbank
The Country of Planks / El País de Tablas
Dark Museum
$30
Purchase all 3
New Title
The Country of Planks / El País de Tablas
by Raúl Zurita
translated by Daniel Borzutzky
$14
Poetry. Latino/Latina Studies. Bilingual Edition.

"The great examples of the investigation, shaping, and liberation of affect, not least militancy, continue to lie elsewhere, in Rimbaud, Vallejo, Césaire, and more recently Raúl Zurita, among numerous others."
- Cal Bedient

"This is a song of the massacred, the destroyed and disappeared during Chilean President Pinochet’s era of tyranny – how can this be if the dismembered, burned and slashed cannot speak? Zurita pulls it out of his body, his day by day, his furnace by furnace mouth, his barracks by barracks and bombs by bombs rebel notary ledger. It is a collection of planks, that is, jagged samples of bone shards, splinters of barrack and tangles of wire, low tremolos of shrieks lingering, blood streams, body-sticks, warehouse and camp whispered love journals before the crematorium and time-space shafts intersecting the death ship Chile-Nagasaki-Auschwitz still in the liminoid edge of our present storms. With the eye and timbre of Rodnoti, Neruda, Bombal and Wiesel, Zurita, through Borzutzky’s masterful translation, hurls himself at our comfort culture barricades. He wants “awakening” –– in spite of the multiple chambers of horrors suffered by innocent peoples, mountains and seas – “There were millions of planets being born there.” And Zurita is one – and this book is thousands. Plank by plank, line by line, this is an inspiring, major work in translation in our post 9-11 era of always-war and terror. Heal with it."
- Juan Felipe Herrera, Poet Laureate of California

"Raúl Zurita is like Jeremiah, a weeping biblical prophet reminding his people of the sins of omission and the embarrassments of complacency. Chile is a minuscule country at the end of the world with more poets per capita than anywhere else. Zurita is a giant among them, like Mistral, Neruda, and Parra. His voice maps the agony lived under tyranny and its aftermath and Daniel Borzutzky’s translations capture it with admirable precision."
- Ilan Stavans, editor of The FSG Book of Twentieth-Century Latin American Poetry

The Country of Planks
New Title
Dark Museum
by María Negroni
translated by Michelle Gil-Monteiro
$8
Literary Nonfiction. Latino/Latina Studies.

"¡Vigilant rationalists! ¡Atención! You are being monitored by death. Despite all your enlightening efforts, she keeps on coming like a mother. Her fertilizer? Your blindness. Your poetry? Her extraterrestrial bed where the worms don’t stop fucking. Translation: if the distinction between the visible and the invisible is one few critics would dare make in the long empirical night of the 21st century, María Negroni’s update of the Gothic is bold because of its perverse retrofuturism. From the neon oceans of Jules Verne to the intergalactic femininity of Aliens, this is the exhibit one step ahead of our end times—the essay as “hallucinatory knowledge” beyond the optics of power, a voluptuous and bottomless lyrical trance."
- Lucas De Lima

Dark Museum
New Title
Wild Grass on the Riverbank
by Hiromi Itō
translated by Jeffrey Angles
$12

"Informed by a brilliant ferality and tour-de-force grotesqueries, Wild Grass on the Riverbank plays upon elements of traditional Japanese sekkyō-bushi to explore the weird defamiliarizations and surreal transplantations of postmodern diaspora. Diaspora is infused with the organic horrors of sexual vines and seedpods, invasive spores, reanimated decomp, and naturalization means to be eaten alive by bugs and wild grasses. A challenging linguistic undertaking deftly translated by Jeffrey Angles, this is a stunningly brutal and relentlessly innovative book by Japan’s ‘shamaness of poetry.’"
- Lee Ann Roripaugh, author of Dandarians

Wild Grass on the Riverbank

by Raúl Zurita

The Country of Planks / El País de Tablas
Raúl Zurita’s books of poems include, among others: Purgatorio (1979), Anteparaíso (1982), El paraíso está vacío (1984), Canto a su amor desaparecido (1985), La vida nueva (1994), Poemas militantes (2000); INRI (2003), Los paises muertos (2006) Las cicudades de agua (2007), In Memoriam (2007), Cuadernos de Guerra (2009), Sueños para Kurosawa (2010), and Zurita (2011). Translations to English include Purgatory, Anteparadise, INRI, Song For His Disappeared Love, Dreams for Kurosawa, and Militant Poems. His numerous awards include the National Literature Prize of Chile and the Pablo Neruda Prize. He lives in Santiago, Chile, where he is a professor of literature at Universidad Diego Portales.

(Translator) Daniel Borzutzky’s recent books and chapbooks include The Performance of Becoming Human (2016); In the Murmurs of the Rotten Carcass Economy (2015); Bedtime Stories for the End of the World!(2014); Data Bodies (2013) and The Book of Interfering Bodies (2011). Poetry translations include Raúl Zurita’s Song for His Disappeared Love (2010), and Jaime Luis Huenun’s Port Trakl (2008). His work has been supported by the PEN American Center, the National Endowment of the Arts, and the Illinois Arts Council.

by María Negroni

Dark Museum
María Negroni (b.1951) is an Argentinian poet, writer, translator, and essayist. She is the author of twelve books of poetry, two novels, and five collections of essays. Previous works translated into English include Islandia: A Poem, Night Journey (both translated by Ann Twitty), The Tango Lyrics and Mouth of Hell (both translated by Michelle Gil-Monteiro). The essays in this book are taken from her essay collection Museo Negro (originally published in 1999).

Michelle Gil-Montero has translated Poetry After the Invention of América: Don’t Light the Flower by Andrés Ajens (Palgrave MacMillan, 2011), Mouth of Hell by María Negroni (Action Books 2013), The Tango Lyrics (Quattro Books, 2012), and This Blue Novel by Valerie Mejer (forthcoming from Action Books). She is the author of Attached Houses (Brooklyn Arts Press, 2013). She lives in Pittsburgh and is Associate Professor of English at Saint Vincent College.

by Hiromi Itō

Wild Grass on the Riverbank
Hiromi Itō emerged in the 1980s as the leading voice of Japanese women’s poetry with a series of sensational works that depicted women’s psychology, sexuality, and motherhood in fresh and dramatic new ways. In the late 1990s, she relocated to southern California, and since then, she has written a number of important, award-winning books about migrancy, relocation, identity, linguistic alienation, aging, and death. Her collection Kawara Arekusa (Wild Grass on the Riverbank) won the 2006 Takami Jun Prize, which is awarded each year to an outstanding, innovative book of poetry.

(Translator) Jeffrey Angles lives in Kalamazoo, where he is an associate professor of Japanese and translation at Western Michigan University. He is the author of Writing the Love of Boys (University of Minnesota Press, 2010) and the award-winning translator of dozens of Japan’s most important modern Japanese authors and poets.